Tarification des routes d’Afrique : Évolution du rôle du secteur privé

There are over one and a half million km of roads in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), including 554,000 km of main roads. Almost without exception, these roads are managed by bureaucratic government roads departments. The roads carry 80 to 90 percent of the region's passenger and freight traffic, absorb 5 to 10 percent of central government recurrent budgets and 10 to 20 percent of their development budgets.

French

The Economics of Traffic Safety

The note examines several possible entry points for debating the economics of traffic safety, namely, the supply side approach, which addresses the cost of accidents to society, and those affected by it; the demand side approach, which addresses the willingness of people to pay, to avoid or curb accidents; the macroeconomic consequences of traffic accidents, and of measures to improve safety, raising questions on the impact of traffic safety on economic growth - an issue subject to much misunderstanding; and, who is responsible, or should pay for.

English

Les aspects économiques de la sécurité routière

The note examines several possible entry points for debating the economics of traffic safety, namely, the supply side approach, which addresses the cost of accidents to society, and those affected by it; the demand side approach, which addresses the willingness of people to pay, to avoid or curb accidents; the macroeconomic consequences of traffic accidents, and of measures to improve safety, raising questions on the impact of traffic safety on economic growth - an issue subject to much misunderstanding; and, who is responsible, or should pay for.

French

Commercializing Africa’s Roads: Transforming the Role of the Public Sector

There are over one and a half million km of roads in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), including 554,000 km of main roads. Almost without exception, these roads are managed by bureaucratic government roads departments. The roads carry 80 to 90 percent of the region's passenger and freight traffic, absorb 5 to 10 percent of central government recurrent budgets and 10 to 20 percent of their development budgets.

English
Keywords: 

SSATP Progress Report 2000

The Sub-Saharan Africa Transport Policy Program (SSATP) was launched fifteen years ago as a joint initiative of the World Bank and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) to improve transport sector performance by promoting policy reforms and institutional changes. The basic premises of the Program are that policy reform is essential in order to improve transport services; and that countries and their development partners need to col-laborate in the sector within a common framework of policies.

English

Assessment of Selected Road Funds in Africa, Case Study of Benin, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya and Zambia

In response to the deteriorating condition of the road network and the high associated economic costs, various stakeholder consultations were held during the 1980s under the umbrella of the Road Management Initiative (RMI), which set the broad outline of a new policy framework for the road sector.

English

Review of the Road Sector in Customs and Economic Union of Central African States (UDEAC)

The review presents an overview of the road sector in the seven UDEAC countries and in the Democratic Republic of Congo. It examines the adequacy of the infrastructure services as well as the efforts to improve financing and management and, thus, the sustainability of service and efficiency. The Central African Republic and Chad are the two truly landlocked countries in the region. However, the Democratic Republic of Congo also faces many of the same problems because of its vast land area and the narrow outlet to the Atlantic Ocean in the west.

English
Keywords: 

Improving Management and Financing of Roads in Sub-Saharan Africa -- Summary Review for 47 SSA Countries

This overview of the road transport sector in Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries, includes an analysis of current status, and developments since 1989, and examines forty seven countries in four regions: the Southern Africa Development Community (SADC) region, which given its large, and more advance economy compared to other countries, has been treated as a separate entity in this review; the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) region; the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) region; and, the Union Douaniere et Economique de l'Afrique Central (UDEAC) region.

English

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