Trade and Transport Facilitation -- A Review of Current Issues and Operational Experience

This joint World Bank/UNCTAD review proposes ways and means to improve the competitiveness of a country's international trade by: increasing the quality and reducing the associated costs of international transport; and reducing any possible transaction cost, adapting commercial practices to international standards, and removing any unnecessary trade barriers within the economic, social, and political context of that country. This report is organized as follows: Chapter 1 of the review provides definitions and introduces some basic concepts and criteria.

English
Keywords: 

The Role of the World Bank in the Development of Urban Transport in Sub-Saharan Africa

During the first period the Bank's main concern was to find ways of relieving urban traffic congestion. This mainly involved the prescription of traffic management, road rehabilitation and road construction. It also involved helping the formal public transport sector become more efficient and building local capabilities to plan, implementation and monitor traffic management schemes. This focus is reflected in the projects undertaken in the Cote d'Ivoire, Mali, Senegal, Cameroon and Zimbabwe.

English
Keywords: 

Expanding Labor-based Methods for Road Works in Africa

Using labor-based methods for road works has been an important part of the strategy to improve rural transport infrastructure in Africa over the past twenty-five years. These methods not only produce gravel roads of equal quality to those produced using equipment-based methods, but they also generate rural employment in a accost-effective manner. Although labor-based methods have proved to be a cost-effective alternative to equipment-based methods in many low-wage Sub-Saharan African countries, these methods have not been applied on large scale.

English

The Problems Facing Labor-based Road Programs and What to Do About Them -- Evidence from Ghana

The literature gives two explanations for contractors' reluctance to adopt labor-based methods. First, contractors believe the cost of learning this new technology is high. Programs designed to promote labor-based methods have always included subsidized training to address this problem. This study argues that focusing on training often diverts attention away from more substantive problems inherent in adopting labor-based methods.

English

Intermediate Means of Transport in Sub-Saharan Africa -- Its Potential for Improving Rural Travel and Transport

Current rural travel and transport are dominated by head loading and walking (largely by women) to satisfy the daily travel and goods movement needs of rural populations in sub - Saharan Africa (SSA). Although rural roads and off-road transport may interact synergistically, with each amplifying the economic and social impact of the other, this interaction has not been directly studied or quantified. When intermediate means of transport (IMTs) have been introduced in the past and used in the transport system, private individuals have usually developed and reaped the benefits.

English
Keywords: 

Rural Roads in Sub-Saharan Africa -- Lessons from World Bank Experience

This report, prepared under the Rural Travel and Transport Project of the sub - Saharan Africa Transport Program (SSATP), presents findings from a review of 127 projects with rural road components in SSA. The review highlights key policy changes discussed under the main headings of planning, design and technology, resource mobilization, and sectoral organization and institutional performance. Planning is seen as a process involving key constituencies at various levels rather than a methodology.

English
Keywords: 

Local Transport Solutions -- People, Paradoxes and Progress -- Lessons Arising from the Spread of Intermediate Means of Transport

This publication is based on the key note paper presented by the author at the experts Meeting on Intermediate Means of Transport (IMT) which took place in Nairobi, Kenya from 15 to 18, June 1999. Some 50 participants from twelve African countries including Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cote d'Ivoire, Eritrea, Ghana, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe attended. Participants also included experts from the Netherlands, Sri Lanka, United Kingdom and the World Bank.

English

Solutions pour le transport local -- Acteurs, exemples et contre exemples -- Enseignements tirés du développement des moyens intermédiaires de transport

This publication is based on the key note paper presented by the author at the experts Meeting on Intermediate Means of Transport (IMT) which took place in Nairobi, Kenya from 15 to 18, June 1999. Some 50 participants from twelve African countries including Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cote d'Ivoire, Eritrea, Ghana, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe attended. Participants also included experts from the Netherlands, Sri Lanka, United Kingdom and the World Bank.

French

Commercializing Africa’s Roads: Transforming the Role of the Public Sector

There are over one and a half million km of roads in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), including 554,000 km of main roads. Almost without exception, these roads are managed by bureaucratic government roads departments. The roads carry 80 to 90 percent of the region's passenger and freight traffic, absorb 5 to 10 percent of central government recurrent budgets and 10 to 20 percent of their development budgets.

English
Keywords: 

Tarification des routes d’Afrique : Évolution du rôle du secteur privé

There are over one and a half million km of roads in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), including 554,000 km of main roads. Almost without exception, these roads are managed by bureaucratic government roads departments. The roads carry 80 to 90 percent of the region's passenger and freight traffic, absorb 5 to 10 percent of central government recurrent budgets and 10 to 20 percent of their development budgets.

French

Pages

Subscribe to foreign exchange