Expanding Labor-based Methods for Road Works in Africa

Using labor-based methods for road works has been an important part of the strategy to improve rural transport infrastructure in Africa over the past twenty-five years. These methods not only produce gravel roads of equal quality to those produced using equipment-based methods, but they also generate rural employment in a accost-effective manner. Although labor-based methods have proved to be a cost-effective alternative to equipment-based methods in many low-wage Sub-Saharan African countries, these methods have not been applied on large scale.

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The Problems Facing Labor-based Road Programs and What to Do About Them -- Evidence from Ghana

The literature gives two explanations for contractors' reluctance to adopt labor-based methods. First, contractors believe the cost of learning this new technology is high. Programs designed to promote labor-based methods have always included subsidized training to address this problem. This study argues that focusing on training often diverts attention away from more substantive problems inherent in adopting labor-based methods.

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Implementing Second Generation Road Funds -- Lessons Learned

The note is based on a review of experience with the operation of second-generation Road Funds in Benin, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, and Zambia. Findings of this review are based on an assessment of the structure, and process of setting up, and implementing the Road Funds, as well as an assessment of the objective achievements to date. While all countries have not moved at the same pace, they have progressed to various stages to introduce institutional, and financial reforms, in the spirit of the Road Management Initiative.

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