The Role of the World Bank in the Development of Urban Transport in Sub-Saharan Africa

During the first period the Bank's main concern was to find ways of relieving urban traffic congestion. This mainly involved the prescription of traffic management, road rehabilitation and road construction. It also involved helping the formal public transport sector become more efficient and building local capabilities to plan, implementation and monitor traffic management schemes. This focus is reflected in the projects undertaken in the Cote d'Ivoire, Mali, Senegal, Cameroon and Zimbabwe.

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Intermediate Means of Transport in Sub-Saharan Africa -- Its Potential for Improving Rural Travel and Transport

Current rural travel and transport are dominated by head loading and walking (largely by women) to satisfy the daily travel and goods movement needs of rural populations in sub - Saharan Africa (SSA). Although rural roads and off-road transport may interact synergistically, with each amplifying the economic and social impact of the other, this interaction has not been directly studied or quantified. When intermediate means of transport (IMTs) have been introduced in the past and used in the transport system, private individuals have usually developed and reaped the benefits.

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Road Sector Performance Indicators for African Countries

Development practice is concerned with achieving results on the ground, towards improving economic, and social welfare. Road sector development, and administration are no exception to it, being increasingly subjected to scrutiny by stakeholders. Assessing outcomes to monitor performance in the road sector is thus at the forefront of sector reform efforts. This technical note aims to set the development of performance indicators in an African context, and, questions whether road administration is on the right track, and, to what extent do international partnerships affect the road system.

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Assessment of Selected Road Funds in Africa, Case Study of Benin, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya and Zambia

In response to the deteriorating condition of the road network and the high associated economic costs, various stakeholder consultations were held during the 1980s under the umbrella of the Road Management Initiative (RMI), which set the broad outline of a new policy framework for the road sector.

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Implementing Second Generation Road Funds -- Lessons Learned

The note is based on a review of experience with the operation of second-generation Road Funds in Benin, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, and Zambia. Findings of this review are based on an assessment of the structure, and process of setting up, and implementing the Road Funds, as well as an assessment of the objective achievements to date. While all countries have not moved at the same pace, they have progressed to various stages to introduce institutional, and financial reforms, in the spirit of the Road Management Initiative.

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Implementation and Impact of RMI - A Survey of Stakeholders in Seven Member Countries

Following extensive consultations with both public and private sector stakeholders, the Road Management Initiative (RMI) formerly known as Road Maintenance Initiative was launched in the late 1980.s as a component of the Sub-Saharan Africa Transport Policy Program (SSATP). This program was led by the Africa Region Infrastructure Department of the World Bank and the Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) in response to an increasing concern over deteriorating road infrastructure in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) despite substantial capital investments by governments and donors.

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