Case Study on Intermediate Means of Transport -- Bicycles and Rural Women in Uganda

The study reviews the intermediate means of transport in eastern Uganda, suggesting that ownership, and use of bicycles is a double-sided factor in meeting household needs, for it not only provides transportation, but serves as a means of income generation. Several factors however, influence ownership of a bicycle, namely, economic status, cultural background, and location with regard to the terrain, and infrastructure. The cost of bicycles is comparatively higher than prices received for agricultural commodities, in addition to the fact that credit availability is non-existent.

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Case Study on the Role of Women in Rural Transport -- Access of Women to Domestic Facilities

Reducing the transport burdens or rural women, in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), would release time and energy for productive and socially beneficial activities. This case study investigates the magnitude of the transport burden incurred in order to obtain access to domestic facilities - collection of water and firewood, and carrying of crops to the grinding mill. The objective of the paper is to assess the impact of "non-transport interventions" to improve access to these facilities on the utilization of time and energy by rural women.

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Promoting Intermediate Means of Transport

A transport system responsive to needs is recognized as a major prerequisite for the social and economic development of rural areas. In Sub-Saharan Africa, the rural transport system are, in general, in a very poor state. Accessibility in rural areas is low and fluctuates with the seasons, and transport costs are irregular but high. Transport needs claim a significant part of daily life for the rural population, especially for women of all ages.

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Intermediate Means of Transport in Sub-Saharan Africa -- Its Potential for Improving Rural Travel and Transport

Current rural travel and transport are dominated by head loading and walking (largely by women) to satisfy the daily travel and goods movement needs of rural populations in sub - Saharan Africa (SSA). Although rural roads and off-road transport may interact synergistically, with each amplifying the economic and social impact of the other, this interaction has not been directly studied or quantified. When intermediate means of transport (IMTs) have been introduced in the past and used in the transport system, private individuals have usually developed and reaped the benefits.

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Rural Roads in Sub-Saharan Africa -- Lessons from World Bank Experience

This report, prepared under the Rural Travel and Transport Project of the sub - Saharan Africa Transport Program (SSATP), presents findings from a review of 127 projects with rural road components in SSA. The review highlights key policy changes discussed under the main headings of planning, design and technology, resource mobilization, and sectoral organization and institutional performance. Planning is seen as a process involving key constituencies at various levels rather than a methodology.

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Local Transport Solutions -- People, Paradoxes and Progress -- Lessons Arising from the Spread of Intermediate Means of Transport

This publication is based on the key note paper presented by the author at the experts Meeting on Intermediate Means of Transport (IMT) which took place in Nairobi, Kenya from 15 to 18, June 1999. Some 50 participants from twelve African countries including Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cote d'Ivoire, Eritrea, Ghana, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe attended. Participants also included experts from the Netherlands, Sri Lanka, United Kingdom and the World Bank.

English

Solutions pour le transport local -- Acteurs, exemples et contre exemples -- Enseignements tirés du développement des moyens intermédiaires de transport

This publication is based on the key note paper presented by the author at the experts Meeting on Intermediate Means of Transport (IMT) which took place in Nairobi, Kenya from 15 to 18, June 1999. Some 50 participants from twelve African countries including Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cote d'Ivoire, Eritrea, Ghana, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe attended. Participants also included experts from the Netherlands, Sri Lanka, United Kingdom and the World Bank.

French

Privately Financed Infrastructure -- A Concession Company’s Point of View

Under a concession system the state grants a franchise the right to finance, build, own, operate, and maintain a public infrastructure for a given period, and to charge users for that service. Concessions are normally stand-alone, single-purpose entities that are expected to finance themselves eventually, if not initially, without recourse to their shareholders. They are independent corporate entities run by a dedicated staff that seeks career advancement within the concession company. Invariably, the successful concession has been created because of a compelling economic need.

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Roads Economic Decision Model (RED) for Economic Evaluation of Low Volume Roads

This Note presents the Roads Economic Decision Model (RED) that performs an economic evaluation of road investments and maintenance options customized to the characteristics of low-volume roads such as: a) high uncertainty of the assessment of traffic, road condition, and future maintenance of unpaved roads; b) periods during a year with disrupted passability; c) levels of service and corresponding road user costs defined not lonely through roughness; d) high potential to influence economic development; and e) beneficiaries other than motorized road users.

English

SSATP Progress Report 2000

The Sub-Saharan Africa Transport Policy Program (SSATP) was launched fifteen years ago as a joint initiative of the World Bank and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) to improve transport sector performance by promoting policy reforms and institutional changes. The basic premises of the Program are that policy reform is essential in order to improve transport services; and that countries and their development partners need to col-laborate in the sector within a common framework of policies.

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